NRCD/NRCS 2011 RANCH TOUR
Ranch Tour/Brush Control Project



The Hereford Natural Resource Conservation District, Cochise County, Arizona is sponsoring brush control projects. A chemical is applied to grassland through airplane seeding or through seeding on the ground (very small pellets). After a rain or two the woody brushs (white thorn, tar bush, cresole, etc) begin to starve themselves to death and the native grasses begin to sprout and replace the open areas. Within a few years, soil erosion decreases significantly and water conservation increases. Lush grasslands replace the previously naked woody brush lands and cattle grazing productivity increases significantly.
The Hereford Natural Resource Conservation District, Cochise County, Arizona is sponsoring brush control projects on range land. After a chemical treatment is applied by airplane seeding or on the ground by spreader seeding (very small pellets), and after a rain or two, the woody bushes start to starve themselves to death. Natural grass sprouts in the vacated areas, ground water springs restart themselves and ground water table rises after a few years. Comparisons are shown between treated and untreated cattle grazing land. Productive increases many times over. Soil erosion decreases significantly and water conservation increases significantly.
The Hereford Natural Resource Conservation District, Cochise County, Arizona, is sponsoring brush control projects. One step in the process is to prepared a Coordinated Resource Management Plan (CRMP) which helps coordinate private land practises with state and federally leased lands requirements. This video introduces the rancher to the process.
The Hereford Natural Resourse Conservation District (HNRCD), Cochise County, Arizona, is sponsoring brush control programs adjacent to the Mexican-US Border. The Arizona State Land Department provides funding to the HNRCD and at a recent Mexican-American Ranchers Tours provided a brief history of the land along the border.
The Hereford Natural Resource Conservation District, Cochise County, Arizona is sponsoring brush control projects on range land. After a chemical treatment is applied by airplane seeding or on the ground by spreader seeding (very small pellets), and after a rain or two, the woody bushes start to starve themselves to death. Natural grass sprouts in the vacated areas, ground water springs restart themselves and ground water table rises after a few years. Soil erosion decreases significantly and water conservation increases significantly. The chemical treatments are identified and detailed application information is provided. Cost information is also provided. This is the 2nd of two videos on this subject.
The Hereford Natural Resource Conservation District, Cochise County, Arizona is sponsoring brush control projects on range land. After a chemical treatment is applied by airplane seeding or on the ground by spreader seeding (very small pellets), and after a rain or two, the woody bushes start to starve themselves to death. Natural grass sprouts in the vacated areas, ground water springs restart themselves and ground water table rises after a few years. Soil erosion decreases significantly and water conservation increases significantly. The chemical treatments are identified and detailed application information is provided. Cost information is also provided.
    On March 21, 2011 about thirty Mexican ranchers and guests and an equal number of Arizona ranchers and guests visited three ranches in the Hereford Natural Resource Conservation District, Cochise County, Arizona. At each ranch, the ranchers and other speakers spoke about their efforts to control brush (White Thorn, Tar Bush, Cresol and Mesquite) through chemical (Spike) and mechanical (Knifing) means.

    The videos of the District ranchers and the spike treatment linked on this page were produced during that tour.   Click on the underlined topics to watch the video.